Bodies of water: recent work by ANDRAE GREEN

I used the sea as a backdrop in my exploration of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in my M-E-T-A series. The earlier work uses the sea as a backdrop to captivity in contrast to the new work that uses the sea/water as an element of liberation.

Andrae Green. The Nine Lives of St. Sebastian, oil on canvas, 2011
Andrae Green – Figure In Repose With Two Sharks, oil on canvas, 2011
Andrae Green: Divers I, oil on canvas, 36″by 46″,2020

THE COVID FLIGHT DRAWINGS

These works (THE COVID FLIGHT DRAWINGS) are inspired by bodies of water and the Caribbean landscape. Growing up in a small island country, this is not only a big part of the environmental consciousness but my personal consciousness as well. Inspired by memories of boys jumping off the dock at Kingston harbor, water is a metaphor for the weightlessness and freedom of the abyss. It is about a leap of faith.

Andrae Green is a painter whose work explores the nuances of the collective consciousness that has been shaped by time, mythology and memory. Green was born in Kingston, Jamaica where he attended the Edna Manley School for the Visual and Performing Arts. Soon after in 2006, Green was awarded a full scholarship grant sponsored by the Jamaican government and the Chase Fund to obtain his MFA in Painting at the New York Academy of Art. In 2011, he was awarded a residency at the CAC Troy, New York. Andrae Green’s paintings have been shown internationally in the US, Jamaica, Canada, China, and France. In 2012 he was one of the first two artists chosen to represent Jamaica in the Beijing Biennale. In 2013, Green was selected as a part of the American delegation that represented the US at the Salon de Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, at the Carrousel du Louvre in Paris, France. In 2019 he was an artist in residence at Experience Jamaique in Geneva Switzerland. Green’s paintings are included in many private collections around the world. In 2017 his piece “Acquiescence I” was acquired by the National Museum of China. He currently lives and works in Western Massachusetts.

ISIS SEMAJ-HALL

READING IS POLITICAL, WORDS ARE PROTEST

During the 1960s, Walter Rodney exploded Jamaica and the Caribbean with a fire to protest this colonial hell that we’ve perpetuated through silence. When grounding with his brothers, who are my brothers too, he professed with clarity that government men “are afraid of that tremendous historical experience of the degradation of the black man being brought to the fore.”[i]  

Continue reading “ISIS SEMAJ-HALL”