The Team

Editor-in-Chief

ANNIE PAUL is a writer and critic based at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, where she is head of the Publications Section at the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies. In 2020 she published a biography of Stuart Hall in UWI Press’s Caribbean Biography Series. Editor-in-chief of the new online magazine of writing PREE (preelit.com) and a founding editor of  Small Axe she has been published in international journals and magazines such as Newsweek International, the Guardian (UK), Chimurenga, The Caravan (India), Slavery & Abolition, Art Journal, South Atlantic Quarterly, Wasafiri, Callaloo, and Bomb and a range of art books and catalogues such as the Brooklyn Museum’s Infinite Island and Documenta11’s Creolite and Creolization. Most recently Paul has published an edited selection from the first 5 issues of PREE, Bookmarked. She is on the board of the National Gallery of Jamaica and has published extensively on art. Paul is author of the blog Active Voice (anniepaul.net). You can follow her on Twitter @anniepaul.

Associate Editors

DIANA McCAULAY is a Jamaican writer and environmental activist. She has written four novels, Dog-Heart, Huracan, Gone to Drift and White Liver Gal. Dog-Heart was shortlisted for the Guyana Prize; both Dog-Heart and Huracan were shortlisted for the Saroyan Prize for International Writing and both Dog-Heart and Gone to Drift were longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Award. Gone to Drift placed second in the Burt Prize for Caribbean Literature, won the Lignum Vitae Vic Reid Award in 2015. McCaulay also won the Hollick Arvon Prize for Caribbean writing in 2014, for her non-fiction work-in-progress Loving Jamaica: a memoir of place and (not) belonging. Her short fiction has appeared in Eleven Eleven, Granta On Line, Fleeting Magazine, The Caribbean Writer, Afro-Beat and Lifestyle Magazine. She was the regional winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize in 2012, for her short story The Dolphin Catchers. You can follow her on Twitter @dmccaulay.

ISIS SEMAJ-HALL is a decolonial feminist, cultural analyst, and bad gyal Ph.D. Her curiosity is piqued at the intersection of art and politics.Shaped by her Jamaican childhood and New York adolescence, she has been known to write on sound studies and remix theory, Rihanna, Protoje, Edwidge Danticat, Marlon James, dub, and dancehall. Semaj-Hall is the author of the “write pon di riddim” blog and she lectures in Caribbean writing, reggae poetry, and popular culture at the University of the West Indies, Mona. See her on Instagram @riddim.writer or chat with her on Twitter @isissemajhall.

Managing Editor

NATALIE REINHART is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University, New York. Her research questions the enduring legal histories of Jamaica from the periods of slavery and Apprenticeship to the present, including the social structures of voice, testimony, and embodiment for young women. Her work asks how agency may be determined through archival and legal documentation, and how race, gender, and vulnerability are fashioned inside of the courtroom and through the category of girlhood. 

She is currently a visiting student at the University of the West Indies, Mona with the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES), as well as a research fellow at Jamaicans for Justice. She worked as an editorial assistant for Small Axe: A Journal of Caribbean Criticism from 2016-2019.

Editors

GARNETTE CADOGAN 

Garnette Cadogan is the Tunney Lee Distinguished Lecturer in Urbanism at the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He’s a Senior Critic in the Sculpture Department at the Yale School of Art and a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia. His research and writing explore the promise and perils of urban life, the vitality and inequality of cities, and the challenges of pluralism. He is the editor-at-large of Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas (co-edited by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro), winner of the 2017 Brendan Gill Prize from the Municipal Art Society of New York, and is at work on a book on walking. Born and raised in Jamaica, Cadogan is now a New Yorker who is found as often in other cities as much as the one he calls home.

ANU LAKHAN will write many things and edit everything. She lives in Trinidad and Tobago with an increasing number of animals. Her poetry, short fiction and book reviews have appeared in Bomb MagazineCaribbean BeatThe Caribbean Review of BooksSX SalonWasafiri, among others. She has been writing about food for almost 20  years: a column for Caribbean Beat started it off, followed by a book on Trinidad street food (also series editor for Macmillan’s Caribbean Street Food). The most recent features have been for Explore Parts Unknown, the web companion to Anthony Bourdain’s show.

Born in Manhattan and raised in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, IVETTE ROMERO has always considered herself to be an islander. Her interest in exploring her family’s diverse Caribbean and trans-Atlantic roots, led her to reroute the path of her doctoral studies in French literature (at Cornell University) towards a comparative exploration of Caribbean literatures and cultures. She is professor of Spanish and Director of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Marist College, where she teaches Latin American literature, cultures, and cinema. Her research interests include Caribbean testimonial narrative, women’s studies, and visual arts. Her work has been published in journals such as Anales del CaribeCallalooMango SeasonNineteenth-Century Literature Criticism, and Sargasso. She has co-edited two volumes with Lisa Paravisini-Gebert, Women at Sea: Travel Writing and the Margins of Caribbean Discourse (2001) and Displacements and Transformations in Caribbean Cultures (2008). Currently, she is writing a book on aesthetic responses to AIDS in the Caribbean.

DONNA HEMANS is the author of River Woman. In 2015, she won the Lignum Vitae Una Marson Award for Adult Literature for her unpublished manuscript Tea by the Sea. Donna’s short fiction has appeared in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Wasafiri Online, Caribbean Writer, Crab Orchard Review, MaComere: The Journal of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars, THEMA, Witness, and the anthology Stories from Blue Latitudes: Caribbean Women Writers at Home and Abroad.

She was the 2007-2008 Black Mountain Institute (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) International Women’s Forum Fellow and twice served as the Lannan Visiting Creative Writer in Residence at Georgetown University. In 2015, she served as writer-in-residence at the University of the District of Columbia. In addition, Donna has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council and the Prince George’s County Arts Council, as well as residential fellowships from Hedgebrook, Millay Colony for the Arts and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

LENIQUECA WELCOME is a Trinbagonian PhD candidate in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn). She is a member of the Collective for Advancing Multimodal Research Arts (CAMRA) at UPenn—an interdisciplinary collective committed to participatory, experimental media-making. She is also a student affiliate of the Center for Experimental Ethnography at UPenn. Prior to starting her PhD program, she was trained as an architect at the Fay Jones School of Architecture and worked at ACLA architecture firm in Trinidad. As a designer and researcher, she is most broadly interested in issues related to securitization, racialization, space, visuality and sovereignty in the Caribbean. Her fieldwork is conducted in Trinidad in the area of East Port of Spain. Her research methods combine participant-observation, archival research, and portraiture photography and collaging. 

Vladimir Lucien is a writer, actor and critic from St. Lucia. His writing has been published in The Caribbean Review of Books, Wasafiri, Small Axe journal, the PN Review, BIM magazine, Caribbean Beat, VOGUE, the Washington Square Review and other journals. He was awarded the first prize in the poetry category of the Small Axe prize 2013 and is the winner of the 2015 OCM Bocas Prize for Literature for his debut collection Sounding Ground, published by Peepal Tree Press in May, 2014. Some of Lucien’s poems have been translated into Dutch, Italian and Mandarin. He is also co-editor of the anthology, Sent Lisi: Poems and Art of St. Lucia which was published in November 2014 and the screenwriter of the documentary The Merikins which premiered at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival in 2013.   

Nadi Edwards teaches in the Department of Literatures in English at The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Jamaica. He has published articles on Caribbean literature and criticism, travel writing, and popular culture.  His research interests include Caribbean literary and cultural studies, and postcolonial literatures and theories.[Ed note: Nadi is excessively modest and this bio hardly begins to describe his accomplishments]

Lue Palmer is a writer of Black speculative and environmental fiction, and a poetry and fiction editor. She is based in Toronto, Canada, with roots in Port Antonio, Jamaica. Her work has been shortlisted for PRISM International Grouse Grind Prize for short fiction and the Exile Writers Prize judged by Joyce Carol Oates, and has appeared in anthologies across North America. Her first full length collection of The Hungry River Bottom (working title) is forthcoming.

YVONNE SINGH is a journalist, writer and editor who has spent more than two decades working in national newspapers and magazines. She has written reportage and features for the Guardian, The Mirror, Evening Standard and The Observer and was a staff journalist at the Guardian for many years and the paper’s Assistant Letters Editor.

 

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Archive

The Team. Issue 1. Crossroads. Below was the setup we started with. The current editorial configuration is as shown above.

Publisher

SHARMAINE LOVEGROVE is the Publisher of Dialogue Books the UK’s only inclusive imprint, part of Little, Brown Book Group and Hachette UK. Prior to going in-house Sharmaine was the Co-Founder and Publishing Director of Dialogue Scouting, the UK’s first book to film & TV scouting consultancy as well as being Literary Editor at ELLE magazine. Her path is drawn from all things innovative in storytelling and in 2008 Sharmaine set up her own bookshop as well as a creative agency in Berlin having worked previously in PR, bookselling, event management and digital consultancy and magazine publishing. Home is London and her roots are Jamaican and stories make her part of the world.  You can follow her on twitter @sharlovegrove

Editor-in-Chief

ANNIE PAUL is a writer and critic based at the University of the West Indies, Mona, where she is head of the Publications Section at the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies. Author of a weekly column in the Jamaica Gleaner and Editor of the book Caribbean Culture: Soundings on Kamau Brathwaite Paul is the recipient of a grant from the Prince Claus Fund (Netherlands). Paul serves on the board of the National Gallery of Jamaica. She is a founding editor of the journal Small Axe and the original Caribbean Review of Books; and has been published in international journals and magazines such as Newsweek International, the Guardian (UK), Chimurenga, The Caravan (India), Slavery & Abolition, Art Journal, South Atlantic Quarterly, Wasafiri, Callaloo, and Bomb. Paul was born in India and is author of the blog Active Voice (anniepaul.net). You can follow her on Twitter @anniepaul.

Editors

DIANA McCAULAY is a Jamaican writer and environmental activist. She has written four novels, Dog-Heart, Huracan, Gone to Drift and White Liver Gal. Dog-Heart was shortlisted for the Guyana Prize; both Dog-Heart and Huracan were shortlisted for the Saroyan Prize for International Writing and both Dog-Heart and Gone to Drift were longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Award. Gone to Drift placed second in the Burt Prize for Caribbean Literature, won the Lignum Vitae Vic Reid Award in 2015. McCaulay also won the Hollick Arvon Prize for Caribbean writing in 2014, for her non-fiction work-in-progress Loving Jamaica: a memoir of place and (not) belonging. Her short fiction has appeared in Eleven Eleven, Granta On Line, Fleeting Magazine, The Caribbean Writer, Afro-Beat and Lifestyle Magazine. She was the regional winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize in 2012, for her short story The Dolphin Catchers. You can follow her on Twitter @dmccaulay.

ISIS SEMAJ-HALL is a decolonial feminist, cultural analyst, and bad gyal Ph.D. Her curiosity is piqued at the intersection of art and politics.Shaped by her Jamaican childhood and New York adolescence, she has been known to write on sound studies and remix theory, Rihanna, Protoje, Edwidge Danticat, Marlon James, dub, and dancehall. Semaj-Hall is the author of the “write pon di riddim” blog and she lectures in Caribbean writing, reggae poetry, and popular culture at the University of the West Indies, Mona. See her on Instagram @riddim.writer or chat with her on Twitter @isissemajhall.

GARNETTE CADOGAN is an essayist. He is editor-at-large for Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas and writes about culture and the arts for various publications. He is a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia, a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University School of the Arts, and a 2017-2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Visiting Scholar at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Born and raised in Jamaica, he’s now a New Yorker who is found as often in other cities as much as the one he calls home.

Creative Director

NERYS HUDSON mainly reads, but sometimes writes and designs as well. Generally, she is happiest when working with stories.